New movie of Stephen King's The Stand lands a director

News Simon Brew 26 Feb 2014 - 06:51

Josh Boone is set to bring The Stand to the big screen, in a single, R-rated movie...

A project that's been gestating for a good while now is a fresh screen take on Stephen King's The Stand. Warner Bros is looking to bring a movie take on the book to cinemas, and previously Scott Cooper- of Crazy Heart fame - had been attached to direct. He dropped out last autumn, however. Previously, the likes of David Yates (Harry Potter) and Ben Affleck had been linked.

Stepping into the director's role now? It looks as if long-time Stephen King fan Josh Boone, director of The Fault On Our Stars, is set to take The Stand on. Furthermore, plans to split the story over several films appear to have been shelved, with the current idea to be a single movie, albeit one that will have an R rating if required.

There's still some way to go in getting The Stand to the screen, but as we hear more, we'll let you know...

The Wrap.

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600+ pages (or a 1000 depending which version you've read.) CANNOT be done in a single film! It should be at least two films if not a trilogy. I've said it before onthese pages and elsewhere, The Stand would be perfect for a US cable TV show where they can develop the story and characters and perhaps you'll then actually care for them when the big pay offs happen. Warner Bros may as well just save their money if they don't want to it justice! This could and should be brilliant considering the talent involved...

I think you need two films. One to get the characters to Boulder and Vegas, one to deal with the conflict between Team Flagg and Team Mother Abigail. Which is pretty much how the 90's mini series split it (albeit as four 90 minute episodes instead of two 3 hour films).

It could be done well as a single film, I think, although it would require a pretty major reworking of the book's structure, paring back the cast, focusing on only a few main characters etc, and you'd be sacrificing so much of the richness and thematic depth of the book that I wonder why you'd bother calling it The Stand at all? Why not just write a new apocalyptic drama? I can see it working, but it would probably require a lot of shorthand, and would definitely be a huge missed opportunity compared to doing it as a TV show. Imagine the depth that format could bring! Introducing all the characters one by one, bringing them together, setting up the world...

Although I was always a wee bit disappointed with the ending, so maybe waiting the length of a film for an anticlimax would be better than waiting an entire series for one.

Whats an R rating? I saw the miniseries years ago when i was only a wee lad and it was an epic story, I don't see how one film could do it justice.

Should be made as a series like Under the Dome, only better. Who knows, if this does well we may finally get The Dark Tower with Nathan Fillion as Roland and, don't tear me a new a##hole but I can see Robert Pattinson as Eddie Dean. Just my opinion. Thoughts?

The Stand was way ahead of the curve when Stephen King first published it out in 1978, a truly Epic Story witnessing a global pandemic that all but obliterates civilisation on a global scale and reduces it to a select group of 'immune' survivors who, for varying reasons, drift into one of two camps.

There is NO WAY a single movie could ever do the story justice unless, as will more than likely be the outcome, the core of the plot is watered down to some simple vacuous 90 minute sermon of the Good, the Bad and the Undecided. No Background, No Character Development, No Thanks!!!

I agree in principle that an update of 1994's (wonderfully realised and long time personal favourite) TV Series adaptation would be welcome especially if it in turn greases the wheels to the production of the long overdue "Dark Tower" series (as long as each book is given the justice to be filmed individually for the big screen and not in proposed half-baked and lack lustre Film/TV mode).

I'd be anticipating a trilogy - Outbreak (Captain Trips)
Conflict (Choosing Sides)
The Stand (The Stand)

IMHO, I reckon the proceeding potential for delving deeper into King's World and the linked crossovers that have always existed for all "constant readers" and first time initiates alike, would be staggering and may help to give Cinema the welcome shot in the arm it so desperately needs in a world already overdosed on directly streamed media (and already tiring of it).

Totally, The Stand was way ahead of the curve when Stephen King first published it in 1978, a truly Epic Story witnessing a horrifically global pandemic that all but obliterates civilisation on a global scale and reduces it to a select group of 'immune' survivors who, for varying reasons, drift into one of two camps.

There is NO WAY a single movie could ever do the story justice unless, as will more than likely be the outcome, the core of the plot is watered down to a simple vacuous 90 minute sermon on the Good, the Bad and the Undecided. No Background, No Character Development, No Thanks!!!

I agree in principle that an update of 1994's (wonderfully realised and long time personal favourite) TV Series adaptation would be intriguingly welcome especially if it in turn helps lead the way for the production of the long overdue "Dark Tower" filming (as long as each book in that series is given the justice of being filmed individually for the big screen and not in the currently proposed and half-baked lackluster Film/TV format) with Frank Darabont at the helm.

The Stand should take the form of a suitably sized trilogy of films;

The Outbreak (Captain Trips)
The Conflict (Choosing Sides)
The Stand (The Stand)

IMHO, I reckon the proceeding potential for delving deeper into King's World and the linked crossovers that have always existed for all "constant readers" and first time initiates alike, would be staggering which in turn may contribute in giving Cinema the welcome shot in the arm it so desperately needs. In a world already overdosed on directly streamed media and already tiring of it, that could only be a good thing.

Sorry but as far as I see it, that's a hey-no on the Pattinson. I read a blog recently that proposed Joseph Gordon Levitt for Eddie which sounded about right or as close to from a standpoint of audience attraction (the big $eller).

Personally, I'm gutted that Javier Bardem is (apparently) out of the running for Roland but could see Jeffrey Dean Morgan don the Gunslingers holsters with their well aimed sandalwood revolvers. Not so sure about the rest of the cast but that's my penny's worth for two at the top.

An R Rating means Restricted in the US, nowadays its seen as the kiss of death for a film it means people under 17 must be accompanied by their parent or guardain.

Ah, i don't understand the reasoning behind lowering the rating. Surely the material warrants a darker version, but eh i'm no Hollywood big shot.

Hello LocalH30! Like yourself I've been a constant reader of King from my early teens and have read most of King's work as they've hit the shelves. All through is great early stuff, to his middling (but still readable) middle years to his post accident return to form. The Constant Reader forwards/afterwards were great and I loved the in jokes peppered through his books. I was blown away with the first version of The Stand but I agreed with popular opinion that the complete cut of The Stand was his masterpiece. I think that you're spot on with your opinions of a single movie version of The Stand. I think a trilogy of movies filmed back to back and released over consecutive years could well become a Hallowe'en Event movie like the LOTR/Hobbit trilogies did at Christmas. Ironically (I say ironically because I loathe the 12A certificate!) Warner's could probably manage a 12A/15 certificate. I think films receiving this certificate are really pushing at the boundaries now; The Hobbit/LOTR for violence and The Women in Black for building a real sense of dread! A lot of the horror in the book isn't visceral but psychological, the fear of being alone and the primeval question of What's In The Dark? I don't think they'll need buckets of blood if they do this right. The first two thirds of I Am Legend were great at building a melancholy mood and a sense of dread too. Lets not go into CGI vampires and daft ending s tho...
I've never read The Dark Tower as most of these were written in the middling years (I really got fed up!) but that's something I aim to rectify soon. I've been wondering since King as revisited The Talisman and The Shining, whether he has plans to revisit Stu and Frannie soon or is something beginning to reawaken in the sewers of Derry?
Thanks for the reply, its nice to know someone reads my stuff on occasion!

I was gobsmacked by the real ending in Vegas (I'm trying to avoid spoilers!) but he could have lost some of the last 100 pages. Like I said in my reply above I hope now Stephen King has released book sequels to The Shining and The Talisman he may get around to visit some of his other classics like IT and The Stand.

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